7.10.19

I respect all opinions and values that any individual may have. What I can do is simply try my very best (even if it is just limited or a small effort compared to the universe) to help people in need. It is all because a human being is not a lifeless object, but a creature with mind and soul.

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7.10.19

To Future HongKongers:

 

Live for Hong Kong!

Die for Hong Kong!

 

A present Hong Konger -2019

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6.10.19

Hong Kong has always felt like a「福地」(fook-dey, blessed-land) to me. Despite the stress of city life I could always find refuge in my family, friends, and community. 

 

Broken families, broken friendships, broken community, broken city, broken agreements, broken trust—the summer of 2019 tore apart the fabric of this city and the countless interwoven relationships of its 7 million inhabitants.

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5.10.19

I come from Shenzhen, and have lived in Hong Kong for nearly a decade. 

 

There is a wide spectrum of opinions among mainlanders towards this summer's protests. I have felt very much conflicted. On one hand, Hongkongers’ negative sentiment towards China is at all time high. On the other, people on my WeChat Circle expressed views that are groundless or very much one-sided. I’m sad because I love China and I love Hong Kong, but this wall between Hong Kong and China is just getting higher and higher.

 

I’ve been reticent on social media because I know for certain that my views will anger both sides and both sides would accuse me of being brainwashed. There’s no point of me trying to argue with anyone when there is so much misled and deluded bigotry from both sides. 

 

I feel sorry for the police even though I understand not all what they did was right. It’s not like the protestors are absolutely saints and flawless even though they are absolutely on the moral high ground. I’ve heard protestors throwing very foul language at police. I’m also very against those who spread police officers’ private life on the internet. 

 

I don’t agree with the violence but that only means I would not participate myself. As I do understand why some people think violence is necessary and peaceful protest is not enough, because I could feel their desperation to protect the core values of their home and the hopelessness underneath. I understand where all the anger is coming from and how it has accumulated over the years. Violent protest is a way to show anger even though the city’s economy and people's normal life have been at stake. Maybe it’s naive of me to hope that it’s a lesson learned for the Chinese authority, that Hongkongers cannot be trifled with, that Hong Kong’s core values must be protected and respected. 

 

In the meantime I’m also very concerned how little still some Hongkongers know about China. Hong Kong has freedom of press but people only pick up bits and pieces without having a full picture. Rejecting China as a whole would mean not only are they 'frogs being boiled by warm water', but also 'frogs that live at the bottom of a well' having tunnel vision. I know this has been said many times in Chinese propaganda. But I truly believe Hongkongers should not be blinded by their political views. 

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4.10.19

I was born and raised in Hong Kong during the 70's and educated in the US.  I have always been proud of my identity being a Hongkongese.  Hong Kong has always been a special, peaceful and unique city on this earth until this summer.  I couldn't believe what we used to have - freedom seems to be gradually taken away by the government or the so-called One Country Two Systems. Our basic human right is having the right to choose whether the result is good or bad. I watch as our rights become less and less, whereas the government's power is getting larger and larger. This ridiculous power and control from the government is creating chaos in this originally peaceful little city.  Citizens are fighting for what we originally had and should have - freedom.

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3.10.19

I was born in the 60s and a native of Hong Kong. I went through the most glorious era in Hong Kong. Growing up in this land - Hong Kong is my hometown. Before 1997, although living under the British colonial system, most people didn’t need to pay attention to politics. Everyone lived in the rule of freedom and equality, and the whole city was harmonious.  After HK returned back to China in 1997, the Chinese Communist Party outwardly advocated a high degree of autonomy of One Country Two systems in Hong Kong. But the CCP was proven to have no contractual spirit. It has consistently ignored the Sino-British Joint Declaration and constantly undermined the core value of Hong Kong as an international financial center, while creating white terror.  The real intention of the CCP is to to advance its form of totalitarianism for global control. Today Hong Kong. Tomorrow the world!

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3.10.19

My feelings got more complicated after a 18-year old boy was shot at point-blank range, as if my feelings for this movement were not complicated enough before that. Helpless, unjust, disappointed, angry, hopeless, etc. The shame and guilt that come flooding in from not being brave enough to stay in the front to endure the ‘appropriate force’ by the ‘green objects’. How is this going to end? How could I slow down in time and space when things are escalating rapidly every week? I don’t want to live in a parallel universe like many choose to. To some people, it is always easier to stay in denial; to not know. That’s not a way to live. That is barely surviving.

 

Public servants who do not serve the public, it should be considered a disgrace to work in police force as they vowed to protect Hong Kong citizens. Blood shed, suspicious bodies found as they claim to be restoring public safety. People living in Yuen Long were left for dead. Hongkongers have been called rioters, cockroaches but the police have been the ones wounding the protestors. Unfair conditions in Letters of No Objection allow police to use excessive force in the most peaceful marches in Hong Kong, resulting in an escalation of violence from protestors as an act to fight back while the police could just retreat. Why can’t the people get the sequence right?

 

I have lost the hope for having universal suffrage. Where is our freedom to express, to gather, to walk on the streets, to wear black and to criticize?

 

When the world is learning to embrace equality and vulnerability, China seems to have fixated in good old world domination, literally. It is like a traumatized adult regressed to a toddler’s stage of fulfilling her missing experience of being strong, only later on to find out the rest of the World had actually moved on from invading other’s boundaries to respecting the boundaries we all deserve. 

 

Last but not least, if Hongkongers are cockroaches, let me remind you that cockroaches have been very resilient.

Liberate Hong Kong, the Revolution of our Times.

Hongkongers, Add oil!

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30.9.19

There are two groups of protesters. Two protestors were already safe and they saw a team of police arresting people from across the street so the two of them suddenly yelled at those police. Then the police turned towards our store and flashed their lights at us so we had to shut our gate for about half an hour. Within this period, I was able to help a few more people.

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20.9.19

When I graduated from journalism school I had a strong desire to engage in war reporting. But fate chose differently for me and I settled for a cozy life of journalism in Hong Kong. However the protests this summer are the closest to war reporting I have experienced. I never thought I would see these scenes play out on my streets. At first they were surreal, like looking at sequences from a Hong Kong gangster or sci-fi movie. But then it slowly became the 'new normal'. Looking how the protests have evolved through a lens was thrilling - and poignant for me as a Hongkonger. The levels of fervour, solidarity, anger and violence I witnessed would be etched in my memory for a long time.

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